Kelly – Comorbidity (February 2021)

CBT@Home webinar series

Comorbidity in practice: Understanding and addressing co-occurring substance use and mental health conditions

Dr Erin Kelly, Matilda Centre for Research in Mental Health and Substance Use, University of Sydney   This approx. 40 min CBT@Home webinar was recorded in January 2021 and is the presentation of her address as the 2020 AACBT Early Career award winner. AACBT members can view for free. Non-members may purchase here.


Neglecting substance use in a client’s presenting problems can lead to an incomplete formulation and less effective treatment. Empowering clinicians to consider the role of substance use in mental health conditions is a key aspect of improving treatment outcomes and providing person-centred treatment.


Biography

Dr Erin Kelly is a Research Fellow at The Matilda Centre for Research in Mental Health and Substance Use at the University of Sydney. Erin is leading a program of research in the translation of brief intervention in schools for the prevention of substance use and mental disorders. As part of this role, she is the lead trainer of the Preventure program in Australia, an evidence-based personality-focused brief intervention that was developed by Professor Patricia Conrod at the University of Montreal.

Erin completed her PhD at the University of New South Wales in 2018, titled “Tackling adolescent bullying head on: Victimisation, perpetration and targeted intervention”. She is continuing her research on bullying at the Matilda Centre.

Erin is also a practicing Clinical Psychologist, currently working in private practice, at Foresight Psychology. Erin graduated from the Master of Clinical Psychology at Macquarie University in 2010, and has since worked as a research psychologist on a number of clinical trials (predominantly delivering interventions for comorbid substance use and mental health problems) and in private practice with various populations.


Key Learning Objectives:

  • An understanding of the theoretical conceptualisation of repetitive thinking and its role as a maintaining factor in depression and anxiety.
  • Knowledge of evidence of the consequences of abstract repetitive thinking.
  • An understanding of the rationale for assessing repetitive thinking with transdiagnostic (rather than symptom-focused) measures, particularly in clients with comorbidity.

Readings:


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