Keynote & Invited Speakers 2022

AACBT 42nd National Conference

Keynote and Invited speakers


Professor Willem Kuyken – keynote speaker

University of Oxford

 

“Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for life”

Professor Willem Kuyken is a research clinical psychologist who earned his PhD from the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, and his Doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the Salomon’s Clinical Psychology Training Programme. He learned cognitive-behavioural therapy over two years as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Cognitive Therapy, University of Pennsylvania / Beck Institute, working with Aaron T. Beck. Since the mid-1990s, his training in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy has included: participation in MBCT/MBSR workshops and retreats; supervision with John Teasdale, Trish Bartley and others; and support of his mindfulness practice in the insight/vipassana tradition from Christina Feldman and Catherine McGee.

Since 2014 he has directed the Oxford Mindfulness Centre. Prof Kuyken was awarded the May Davidson award for clinical psychologists who “have made an outstanding contribution to the development of clinical psychology within the first ten years of their work as a qualified clinical psychologist.” He was “grand-fathered” as a Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy.


Dr Cammi Murrup-Stewart – keynote speaker

Monash University

“First Nations wellbeing: myths, misconceptions and mobilising strengths”

Dr Cammi Murrup-Stewart, is an Aboriginal woman with close ties to Wurundjeri Country and a family history impacted by the Stolen Generation policies. An Assistant Lecturer (Indigenous) and researcher at the Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, Monash University, her research focuses on the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal youth, with an emphasis on building the strategies young mob have for improving their wellbeing and mental health, using Indigenous methodologies, and supporting Indigenous students pursuing higher education. Her research aims to centre the voices of Indigenous peoples and other marginalised groups.

Cammi has over 8 years of experience in the international and local community development and health sectors, with a Bachelor and Masters in International Development. She has won a number of awards over the years, including the 2020 Premier’s Award for Health and Medical Research – Indigenous Researcher. Cammi also lives with multiple disabilities and chronic illnesses, and advocates for greater accessibility and inclusion.


Associate Professor Dana Wong – invited speaker

La Trobe University

“Can CBT be effectively adapted for people with cognitive impairment after acquired brain injury?”

Associate Professor Dana Wong is an Associate Professor and Clinical Neuropsychologist in the School of Psychology and Public Health at La Trobe University. She leads the eNACT (Neurorehabilitation And Clinical Translation) Research Group, which focuses on innovative neuropsychological rehabilitation techniques to improve the lives of brain injury survivors, and enhancing clinical implementation of and clinician competence in these evidence-based interventions. She has published over 65 peer-reviewed journal articles, several book chapters, and a treatment manual on Cognitive Behaviour Therapy – Adapted for Brain Injury (CBT-ABI). She has received over $14.2million in research funding. She was awarded La Trobe’s 2020 Research Engagement and Impact Award.

Dana’s practical clinical training approach has been recognised with several awards including the 2021 AAUT Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning, 2018 APS Early Career Teaching Award, and the 2016 Australasian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment (ASSBI) Clinical Innovation Award. Dana is currently President-Elect of ASSBI and an Editorial Board member for the journal Brain Impairment. She co-leads BRAINSPaN, a multidisciplinary community of practice of clinicians and researchers in the brain impairment field. She is a member of the Attention, Memory and Depression & Anxiety working groups for the Stroke Foundation’s Living Stroke Guidelines.


Professor Andrew Chanen – invited speaker

Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health

Professor Andrew Chanen is Director, Clinical Programs and Services at Orygen. Andrew’s research, clinical and training interests lie in prevention and early intervention for severe mental disorders, principally personality disorders, along with mood and psychotic disorders. He developed and directs the award-winning Helping Young People Early program, a clinical, research and training program run out of Orygen that is focused on understanding, preventing and treating severe personality disorder in young people. Andrew has been the President of the International Society for the Study of Personality Disorders since 2011 and an Executive Board Member since 2003. He serves on the editorial boards of Early Intervention in Psychiatry, Psychopathology, Personality and Mental Health and is a reviewer for local and international scientific journals. Andrew’s research includes the published first randomised controlled trial of early intervention for borderline personality disorder in young people.


Associate Professor Laura Jobson – invited speaker

Monash University

“Considering the Role of Culture in Trauma-Focused Psychological Interventions”

Associate Professor Laura Jobson completed her PhD (Clinical Psychology) at the Australian National University in 2008. Following this she worked as a post-doc researcher in Uganda and then as a Clinical Lecturer/ Senior Lecturer at the University of East Anglia. In 2010, Dr Jobson was awarded a prestigious NIHR Fellowship hosted by the Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, University of Cambridge to study the influences of culture on post trauma recovery. In 2015 she moved to Monash University. She is a registered Clinical Psychologist specialising in the areas of culture and trauma.

Dr Jobson leads three related themes in her program of research: 1) emotional and cognitive substrates of PTSD and depression, 2) translational studies, and 3) the role of cultural practice in wellbeing. In the emotional and cognitive substrates arm, Dr Jobson’s research has investigated the role of instrumental psychological processes in the development and maintenance of PTSD and depression. In particular, her research has addressed a major limitation associated with cognitive models and treatments of these disorders; namely, that they have been developed based on Western cultural norms and values. In the translational arm, Dr Jobson has been involved in developing cost-effective interventions for those with PTSD and depression in humanitarian contexts and low- and middle-income countries. Dr Jobson currently has over 80 publications in the area and has received funding from several sources (e.g., NIHR, Wellcome Trust, UK AID, Ian Potter Foundation NHMRC Ideas Grant, NHS).


Dr Zeffie Poulakis & Dr Carmen Pace – invited speaker presentation

The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne

“Mental health in trans, gender diverse, and non-binary young people: what we know and how to help”

Dr Zeffie Poulakis is a clinical psychologist who, following completion of her undergraduate studies in psychology, commenced a research career at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute. She subsequently undertook training in clinical, child, adolescent and family psychology, and has been practicing as a psychologist for over a decade. Following clinical roles in public child and adolescent services and private practice, Zeffie is now part of the team at the Royal Children’s Hospital Gender Service where she works as a senior clinical psychologist. She is also the Director of the Victorian Infant Hearing Screening Program at the Royal Children’s Hospital’s Centre for Community Child Health, and Research Officer with the Child Health Services Research Group at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute.

Dr Carmen Pace is a clinical psychologist and researcher who holds a PhD and Master of Psychology (Clinical Child specialisation) from the University of Melbourne. She has worked with children, adolescents and their families in a range of contexts, conducts research in paediatric health, and regularly contributes to teaching and supervision in undergraduate and postgraduate psychology courses. Carmen currently holds appointments as a senior clinical psychologist in the Gender Service (Department of Adolescent Medicine) and in the Psychology Service (Mental Health) at the Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne, a Hugh Williamson Trans 20 Research Fellow at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, and an honorary senior fellow in the Department of Paediatrics at the University of Melbourne.


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